Leiden Psychology Blog

rss

Tag: Stress

  • Assessing stress: a matter of the heart?

    Assessing stress: a matter of the heart?

    'I didn’t see it coming until it was too late' – a remark I often hear from clients suffering from burnout. They had often been pushing the limits without realizing that their stress levels were building up.
  • A crazy little thing: Cold love

    A crazy little thing: Cold love

    A fresh start to a new year. Some take it literally and take a dive in the chilling ocean. For most, the thought sends a shiver down the spine. But taking that plunge might not be a bad idea. Should exposing yourself to cold be one of your resolutions?
  • Stress in your mind: mind the stress?

    Stress in your mind: mind the stress?

    Severe stress can affect our somatic well-being – but is part of this stress created in our minds? A recent meta-analysis on the link between worrying and the physiological stress response suggests that worrying does indeed affect our heart and hormones.
  • On sabbatical

    On sabbatical

    “Enjoying your vacation?”, my friends and relations ask me, knowing I’m ‘on sabbatical’. At home the word sabbatical triggers a knowing grin; I’m working as much as ever. But my stress levels are lower, and I come back from work happy each day.
  • The Psychology of Putin

    The Psychology of Putin

    Whether in politics or in daily life, we all encounter conflicts: between colleagues, relations, or neighbours. Often these seems to stem from conflicting interests or the allocation of scarce resources.
  • Learning is a series of sprints, not a marathon

    Learning is a series of sprints, not a marathon

    Many students (and people in general) like to mass their efforts to boost short-term performance when an important exam or deadline is approaching. Scientific research points to a more functional and efficient long-term strategy to raise performance.
  • Can you ‘pose’ your way to success?

    Can you ‘pose’ your way to success?

    Tina van Dam | | 1
    Have you ever wondered why is it that sometimes you perform extremely well at presentations or job interviews while at other times your brain seems to freeze? Your performance in such tasks depends on the levels of two hormones: testosterone and cortisol.
  • Brain scars

    Brain scars

    Abuse or neglect as a child may lead to the development of anxiety or depression related symptoms years later. Are traces of childhood adversities also visible in our brain? And if so, what does this mean?