Leiden Psychology Blog

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Category: Applied Cognitive Psychology

  • Living with gender dysphoria

    Living with gender dysphoria

    You may have heard the phrase ‘born in a wrong body’. However, for anyone who isn’t transsexual, it is very difficult to imagine what that feels like and how it affects our daily lives. Where does the feeling, gender dysphoria come from in the first place?
  • Preferred temperature enhances working memory

    Preferred temperature enhances working memory

    Lorenza Colzato | | 0
    Humans are strongly affected by climate and temperature. Studies show that colder environments foster cognitive performance. Colzato and Sellaro found that working memory can be enhanced by performing under the preferred, not the objective temperature.
  • Eating to stop

    Eating to stop

    Lorenza Colzato | | 0
    A famous statement of the German philosopher Ludwig Feuerbach is "Der Mensch ist, was er iβt" (you are what you eat), but is it really true that the food we eat modulates the way we think and perceive the world?
  • Refueling your mental engine, cheap and easy!

    Refueling your mental engine, cheap and easy!

    Bryant Jongkees | | 2
    Ever feel like your brain is running out of fuel? Our study shows that eating the right food can give you back that edge needed to keep up your great performance. In fact, food is found to be an efficient and easy way to enhance your cognition!
  • Truly awesome data

    Truly awesome data

    Researchers perform studies to test their hypothesis. Yet, some hypotheses require data so special, that they are rarely tested. The Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety provides researchers in Leiden, Amsterdam, and Groningen with such special data
  • Active bodies think more deeply

    Active bodies think more deeply

    Lorenza Colzato | | 0
    Active bodies think more deeply. This is the outcome of a study by cognitive psychologist Lorenza Colzato and her fellow researchers at Leiden University, published in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience.
  • Don’t go to sleep!

    Don’t go to sleep!

    Claudia Pama | | 0
    Feeling down? Perhaps experiencing some winter blues? Sleep deprivation might be the answer. Neuroscientists at Tufts University have revealed an interesting mechanism behind this puzzling solution, by investigating the role of astrocytes.
  • Do the peanut butter sniff test

    Do the peanut butter sniff test

    Rebecca Joubert | | 0
    By using the peanut butter test it is possible to determine whether someone is suffering from Alzheimer’s disease. This is the outcome of a study published in the Journal of the Neurological Sciences.
  • Learning is a series of sprints, not a marathon

    Learning is a series of sprints, not a marathon

    Many students (and people in general) like to mass their efforts to boost short-term performance when an important exam or deadline is approaching. Scientific research points to a more functional and efficient long-term strategy to raise performance.
  • Eating to trust

    Eating to trust

    Lorenza Colzato | | 1
    The administration of the amino acid tryptophan (TRP), contained in food such as fish, soy, eggs, and spinach, promotes interpersonal trust. This is the outcome of a study that we published in Psychological Science.
  • Winter blues?

    Winter blues?

    Depressed people report seeing the world as “dim, and lacking in color”. Is this a nice figure of speech, or a real perceptual shift? We investigated this question, particularly relevant now that the days are getting shorter and shorter…
  • Why aren’t robots doing my laundry yet?

    Why aren’t robots doing my laundry yet?

    We are still waiting for robots that make our everyday life easier by doing the dishes and cleaning our homes. Of course, we have machines such as Roombas that can vacuum, sort of, but why do we still have to bother doing all those boring things ourselves?
  • Decision making in the game of life

    Decision making in the game of life

    Jonathan Barnhoorn | | 0
    Recent research has revealed a causal link between serotonin levels and people’s ‘sense of fairness’. A fascinating discovery because serotonin levels are in part dependent on what we eat. So, can you eat yourself toward a fairer world?
  • The compensatory effects of food

    The compensatory effects of food

    Laura Steenbergen | | 0
    The economic crisis has resulted in many budget cuts in health care and general care programs. The population as a whole is aging, and yet we desire to stay independent as long as possible. How can we retain the cognitive abilities supporting independence?
  • Can you ‘pose’ your way to success?

    Can you ‘pose’ your way to success?

    Tina van Dam | | 1
    Have you ever wondered why is it that sometimes you perform extremely well at presentations or job interviews while at other times your brain seems to freeze? Your performance in such tasks depends on the levels of two hormones: testosterone and cortisol.
  • Running for happiness

    Running for happiness

    Hans Revers | | 0
    Why do some people run marathons? And why do they often appear to be so happy, even exhilarated after hours of running? There must be something wrong with them, or do they know something that we don't?
  • Cannabis use: doorway to creativity or to delusions?

    Cannabis use: doorway to creativity or to delusions?

    Meriem Manaï | | 4
    Cannabis is the most commonly used illicit drug in the world and it has been used for centuries. Many acclaimed artists from a variety of disciplines, maintain its usefulness in the enhancement of creativity. However, is there any truth in their claims?
  • A matter of taste

    A matter of taste

    Why can’t we rely on our taste buds? Why has our food become saltier, sweeter and fatter? And why is it a bad idea to have lunch behind our computer?
  • Pope Francis: Do I have your attention?

    Pope Francis: Do I have your attention?

    Lorenza Colzato | | 0
    Roman Catholics have a new leader: Francis, the first Latin American Pope. Catholicism has more than a billion followers worldwide. How does Catholicism influence the way believers of this religion look at the world?
  • Measuring the unconscious mind

    Measuring the unconscious mind

    People are unaware of much of the knowledge they possess, making it hard for psychologists to study this knowledge. We need ways to investigate the unconscious mind, and perhaps making use of people’s greediness is one of the ways to do this.
  • Sexual pheromones: myth or truth?

    Sexual pheromones: myth or truth?

    Lorenza Colzato | | 7
    Valentine’s Day is the day of love. Especially nowadays, pheromones are advertised and sold as cologne or perfume in order to stimulate attraction between people. However, the question is: do sexual pheromones really exist, and how good are they?
  • Are we what we eat?

    Are we what we eat?

    Lorenza Colzato | | 8
    'Der Mensch ist, was er iβt' (you are what you eat) is a famous quotation from the German philosopher Feuerbach, suggesting that the food one eats has a bearing on one's state of mind. Can food function as cognitive enhancer?